6 Top Tips for overwhelmed working mums


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If you have children and you’re also trying to hold down a working life outside the home, you will know how busy it feels – all the time! Before you know it, you’re experiencing stress, getting irritable and feeling overwhelmed with how much you have to do each day. Talk to any working mum and they will recognise this. For single mums it can especially difficult – and I know because I was one!

Now I’m no fairy godmother and there is no magic wand to make all this disappear, but there are ways to make it easier for yourself. I’m going to share the tips I used which helped me, and recommend some others that would have made things better for me at the time – had I known them.

Tip 1 – Recognise you can’t do everything and prioritise

Work out what is important. List everything on your mind and split the items into essentials and desirables. Essentials need to be top of your priority list – the desirables can wait

Tip 2 – Get a routine

When you’re busy, it’s helpful to have a schedule to guide you. Think of it like the timetable you used at school – that helped you know what was necessary that day, where to be and when, and what to be doing, as your time was broken down into manageable chunks

Tip 3 – Delegate

You may have a supportive partner who can share the load – so use them. Give them specific things to do, like a good manager does with a team at work. Get the children involved in tasks too – depending on their ages there is usually something they can do to help. Make others responsible for doing their bit! Things may not be done to your standards by the way, but learn to let that go – it’s better for you to get the help

Tip 4 – Back up team

We can all use a support team. Sometimes that doesn’t seem possible, but there are ways to develop one. Your children have friends and their parents are probably working too – perhaps there’s an opportunity to see if you can work out something between you, which allows everyone to take turns doing school drop offs or collecting for example. Rope in anyone in your wider family who might be willing to help when you are stuck

Tip 5 – Ask for help

Most parents are reluctant to ask for help because they believe they should be able to cope by themselves. The problem is, when things become too much you can suffer burnout. Once that happens, others will be saying – “if only I’d known, I could have helped you”. Families and friends can often help out, especially if you let them know you need some support. If you are noticing signs of overwhelm then ask for help. It feels good to know you have helped someone who is having problems, so don’t deny the people who care about you that opportunity

Tip 6 – Look after yourself

I bet you are last on your list of priorities – right? With everything else you have to do, how on earth can you spare the time to look after you! Step 1 is to slow down. Stop! When you take care of yourself, you are in a much better place to support your children. Once they are in bed, do something nice for you. Perhaps you enjoy a relaxing bath or time to watch your favourite TV programme. Perhaps you would benefit from catching up on some quality sleep. Whatever you choose, do something that makes you feel good. By looking after yourself, you are taking better care of your children too

Remember that you don’t have to be perfect. There is no such thing as the perfect parent. Do the best you can, with what you have right now. As far as your children are concerned, that will always be good enough!

If you are really struggling with stress, anxiety or lack of sleep and would like some professional psychological help, then do what other overwhelmed parents have done and check out my website at http://www.mindmakeoveruk.com. There are lots of ways I can help you feel more in control and you don’t need to manage this on your own.

 

 

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Too busy to think about Christmas?

Too busy to think about Christmas?


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Overworked and stressed already?

Perhaps you are juggling a working life with a family life, or perhaps you feel like there’s just not enough hours in a day?

The Christmas period seems to start earlier every year – looking around the town and online it is already upon us and it’s still only November! Even with a few weeks to go, do you feel stressed or even overwhelmed with how much you have to do?

If you have a look around on the internet you’ll find lots of people offering to coach you through this – they even pop up on Facebook ads now so there is no escape. It just goes to show what a problem it is for people – spawning all these new businesses! So with all the stuff that’s out there – usually pretty basic stuff too – what advice can I, as a Psychologist, pass on?

First of all, recognise that you have an issue with constant busyness and that it leads to inevitable overwhelm. How many of these ‘busyness’ behaviours do you recognise?

  • Multitasking – “I am listening to you, I’m just quickly replying to this email/message/doing something else”
  • Time Management – “I have to finish this so I’ll just work through my lunch/take it home/cancel my day off/use my only free time”
  • Messy workspace or home environment – “I know I have stuff everywhere, but I know where things are”
  • Unfocused – “I check my social media in case I miss something – I try not to get too distracted from what I’m supposed to be doing”
  • Being too available to everyone – “If you need to reach me, then just phone/message/email me and I’ll get right back to you”

Recognise any of these? They can apply to your work or your home life, or perhaps both!

Did you realise that the happiest, most successful people are relaxed and take things in their stride because they have firm boundaries around working time and personal time?

This includes the distinction between work you do in the home (housework, childcare, chores) versus the things you enjoy – the stuff that nurtures you and feels good.

The happiest, most successful people are not constantly busy. They prioritise their time in a healthy way. They don’t stay late at the office and they always take all of their holiday entitlement. They take days off. They enjoy their weekends. They spend evenings at home with their family, making time to relax or socialising, not constantly buried in a laptop, paperwork, their phone or endless chores. They ensure they make time for quality sleep. They make time to eat mindfully – enjoying a meal rather than being engrossed in something else. If this doesn’t sound like you, but you’d like it to be – you now know what you need to do!

If you need help with that, then have a read through some of my previous blogs or get in touch to find out about how you can work with me.

I am Susan Tibbett, a Chartered Psychologist and Personal Development Specialist based in York. You can reach me at http://www.mindmakeoveruk.com

Mr Angry and Mr Calm – a lesson in Emotional Intelligence


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Have you ever been fascinated observing arguments between other people? If you’re anything like me then the answer to this question is a resounding YES. Perhaps I’m just a bit nosey but I’ve always been interested in the ways people interact and what it tells me about the social skills of the people involved.

I was listening and watching just such a disagreement the other day between 2 guys I shall call Mr Angry and Mr Calm. They got me thinking again about Emotional Intelligence and how the ability to manage people and relationships is so important in both our careers and our personal lives. To be successful in our interactions with other people we need to be continuously learning how to be more flexible, adaptable and accepting. Even in the face of someone else’s criticism, misguided opinion or downright nastiness, it is healthiest to find a measured response, even when emotions may be running high.

In the disagreement I watched, Mr Angry was being rude and arrogant and belittling everything Mr Calm said. Mr Calm, despite the provocation, decided not to respond with similar anger but to remain calm and walk away. This diffused the situation and left Mr Angry dumbfounded. I admired Mr Calm – it is not always easy to stay in control when confronted with an emotional, unreasoned outburst. He had clearly practiced this way of behaving and it stopped any escalation of the situation. How different it would have been if Mr Angry had met Mr Angry instead. Perhaps like me you’ve witnessed Road Rage, Shop Rage or Childlike Tantrums – and they never end well! So what can we learn from this about Emotional Intelligence?

Daniel Goleman, an American psychologist, developed a framework of 5 elements that define emotional intelligence:

Self-Awareness – Emotionally intelligent people understand their emotions, and because of this, they aren’t ruled by their feelings. People who are self aware confidently trust their intuition. They are also willing to analyse their own strengths and weaknesses so they can learn to improve.

Self-Regulation – Emotionally intelligent people are able to control their emotions and impulses, and typically don’t make rash decisions. They think before they act. People who self-regulate are thoughtful, comfortable with change, have integrity, and are assertive.

Motivation – Emotionally intelligent people are usually motivated. They recognize the value of deferring immediate results for long-term success. They are highly productive, welcome a challenge, and tend to be very effective in whatever they do.

Empathy – Emotionally intelligent people can identify with, and understand, the wants, needs, and viewpoints of others. They recognize how others may be feeling, even when this may not be obvious. They are excellent at managing relationships, listening, and relating to others. They avoid stereotyping and quick judgements, and they live their lives in a very open, honest way.

Social Skills – Emotionally intelligent people are easy to talk to and are usually very likeable. They are typically team players who are happy to help others develop and shine rather than focus on their own success. They are excellent communicators who manage disputes well and find it easy to build and maintain healthy relationships.

So how do you measure up? Who is more familiar – Mr/Mrs Angry or Mr/Mrs Calm? Observe how you react to other people. Do you make quick judgements before you know all of the facts? Do you stereotype people? Do you seek attention for what you’ve achieved? Do you know your own weaknesses? Are you willing to work on them? What are you like in stressful situations – do you get easily upset and emotional? Do you blame others before looking at yourself?

So what can we learn from Mr Calm – Mr Emotionally Intelligent?

The ability to stay calm and in control in difficult situations is highly valued – especially in the workplace. Think about how developing this skill could benefit your personal life too. Wouldn’t you like to be able to keep your emotions under control even when things go wrong? Next time you are in a stressful situation observe how you think and behave. Practice taking a step away from your initial emotional reaction and consider alternatives.
When we take an honest look at ourselves and evaluate our habitual ways of reacting and responding we often find there is a better way.

http://www.mindmakeoveruk.com